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Saturday, March 19, 2016

Yorkshire Terrier



The Yorkshire Terrier (also called a "Yorkie") originated in Yorkshire (and the adjoining Lancashire), a region in northern England.In the mid-19th century, workers from Scotland came to Yorkshire in search of work and brought with them several different varieties of small terriers. Breeding of the Yorkshire Terrier was "principally accomplished by the people—mostly operatives in cotton and woolen mills—in the counties of Yorkshire and Lancashire. Details are scarce. Mrs. A. Foster is quoted as saying in 1886, "If we consider that the mill operatives who originated the breed...were nearly all ignorant men, unaccustomed to imparting information for public use, we may see some reason why reliable facts have not been easily attained.

The breed sprang from three different dogs, a male named Old Crab and a female named Kitty, and another female whose name is not known. The Paisley Terrier, a smaller version of the Skye Terrier that was bred for a beautiful long silky coat, also figured into the early dogs. Some authorities believed that the Maltese was used as well.They were all originally bred from Scotch Terriers (note: meaning dogs from Scotland, not today's Scottish Terrier) and shown as such...the name Yorkshire Terrier was given to them on account of their being improved so much in Yorkshire." Yorkshire Terriers were shown in a dog show category (class) at the time called "Rough and Broken-coated, Broken-haired Scotch and Yorkshire Terriers". Hugh Dalziel, writing in 1878, says that "the classification of these dogs at shows and in the Kennel Club Stud Book is confusing and absurd" in lumping together these different types.


In the early days of the breed, "almost anything in the shape of a Terrier having a long coat with blue on the body and fawn or silver coloured head and legs, with tail docked and ears trimmed, was received and admired as a Yorkshire Terrier But in the late 1860s, a popular Paisley type Yorkshire Terrier show dog named Huddersfield Ben, owned by a woman living in Yorkshire, Mary Ann Foster, was seen at dog shows throughout Great Britain, and defined the breed type for the Yorkshire Terrier.


Small in size but big in personality, the Yorkshire Terrier makes a feisty but loving companion. The most popular toy dog breed in the U.S., the "Yorkie" has won many fans with his devotion to his owners, his elegant looks, and his suitability to apartment living.
Yorkshire Terriers seem oblivious of their small size. They are very eager for adventure. This little dog is highly energetic, brave, loyal and clever. With owners who take the time to understand how to treat a small dog, the Yorkie is a wonderful companion! It is affectionate with its master, but if humans are not this dog's pack leader, it can become suspicious of strangers and aggressive to strange dogs and small animals. It can also become yappy, as the dog does their best to tell you what IT wants YOU to do. It has a true terrier heritage and needs someone who understands how to be its leader. Yorkies are often only recommended for older, considerate children, simply because they are so small, most people allow them to get away with behaviors no dog should display. This changes the dog’s temperament, as the dog starts to take over the house (Small Dog Syndrome).


Yorkies that become demanding and dependent, appearing to need a lot of human attention and/or developing jealous behaviors, snapping if surprised, frightened or over-teased, have owners who need to rethink how they are treating the dog. Owners who do not instinctually meet the dog’s needs may also find them to become overprotective and become neurotic. Yorkies are easy to train, although they can sometimes be stubborn if owners do not give the dog proper boundaries. They can be difficult to housebreak. The Yorkie is an excellent watchdog. When owners display pack leadership to the Yorkshire Terrier, it is very sweet and loving and can be trusted with children. The problems only arise when owners, because of the dog’s cute little size, allow it to take over the house. The human will not even realize it; however, know if you have any of the negative behaviors listed above, it's time to look into your pack leader skills. These are truly sweet little dogs that need owners who understand how to give them gentle leadership. If you own a Yorkie that does not display any of the negative behaviors, high-five for being a good pack leader!

Friday, March 18, 2016

Adopt a Pet

pet adoption

Every dog or cat not purchased from a pet store or backyard breeder improves the pet overpopulation problem created by irresponsibility and greed.


Adopting a dog or cat from a no-kill shelter can free up space for older or special needs pets that may not find new homes before the end of their natural lives.


There are plenty of animals to choose from at most shelters. They come in every age, shape, size, coat color and breed mix, and you can find purebreds at shelters as well. In fact, many breeds have their own rescue organizations, so if you're looking for a purebred, make sure to check both your local shelter and breed rescue organization.


Compared to the cost of purchasing a pet, adopting one from an animal shelter is relatively inexpensive. And if you get a slightly older dog or cat, there's a good chance he is already fully vaccinated and neutered.


Adopting an older pet allows you to skip over the time consuming, often frustrating puppy or kitten stage of development.


Adopting a mature dog or cat also takes the guesswork out of determining what your pet will look like as an adult – what size she'll grow to, the thickness and color of her coat and her basic temperament, for example.


Depending on his background, your older pet may already be housebroken or litter box trained and know basic obedience commands like come, sit, stay and down.



Most shelters and rescue organizations do assessments on every new pet taken in, to determine things like temperament, whether the pet has any aversion to other pets or people, whether he is housebroken, has had obedience training, etc. Many of these organizations also have resources to help pets with lack of training or behavioral issues. So when you adopt a pet from one of these organizations, you have a pretty good idea what to expect from your new dog or cat when you bring him home.


Many shelters and rescues also provide lots of new owner support in the form of materials about training, common behavior problems, nutrition, basic grooming and general care. In some cases there are even free hotlines you can call for questions on behavior, training and other concerns.


If you have kids, and especially if the new pet will belong to a child, adopting a shelter animal can open a young person's eyes to the plight of homeless pets. It can also help him learn compassion and responsibility, as well as how wonderful it feels to provide a forever home to a pet that might otherwise live life in a cage, or be euthanized.


An older adoptive pet can be the perfect companion for an older person. Many middle-aged and senior dogs and cats require less physical exertion and attention than younger animals.


An adopted pet can enrich your life in ways both big and small. The unconditional love and loyalty of a dog or cat can lift depression, ease loneliness, lower blood pressure, and give you a reason to get up in the morning. A kitty asleep in your lap feels warm and comforting. A dog that loves to walk or run outdoors can be just the incentive you need to start exercising regularly.


There are countless benefits to pet ownership, and when you know you saved your furry companion from an unpleasant fate, it makes the bond you share that much more meaningful.

Thursday, January 14, 2016

Rottweiler

Pet Net brings you today the Rottweiler




rottie

Like the mythical Greek hero Hercules, the Rottweiler is strong and true with a loving heart. Affectionately called Rotties or Rotts, the breed originated in Germany, where it was used to drive cattle and pull carts for farmers and butchers. That heritage is reflected in the Rottie's broad chest and heavily muscled body. When he moves, he displays strength and stamina, but when you look into his eyes you see warm, dark-brown pools reflecting a mellow, intelligent, alert, and fearless expression.



A well-bred Rottweiler is calm and confident. He's typically aloof toward strangers, but never timid or fearful. Rottweilers exhibit a "wait-and-see" attitude when confronted with new people and situations. When these characteristics come together as they should, the Rottweiler is a natural guard dog with a mellow disposition who is successful not only in police, military, and customs work, but also as a family friend and protector.
Rottweiler have a natural instinct to protect their families and can be ferocious in their defense. It's essential to channel their power and protectiveness by providing early socialization, firm, fair, consistent training and leadership, and a regular job to perform. When this doesn't happen, rottweiler can become dangerous bullies rather than the companionable guardians they're meant to be.

Rottweilers walk a fine line between protectiveness and aggressiveness. If they aren't carefully bred for a calm, intelligent temperament and properly socialized and trained, they can become overly protective. That might sound like what you want, but a Rottie who lacks the ability to discriminate is dangerous to everyone he encounters, not just the bad guys.

You must be able to provide your Rottweiler with leadership he can trust and respect without resorting to anger or physical force. Otherwise, he'll take the role of top dog for himself. With a dog as powerful and intelligent as the Rottweiler, this is a recipe for disaster.






Despite what you might have heard, Rottweilers are not temperamentally unsound or inherently vicious. Well-bred, well-socialized Rotties are playful, gentle, and loving to their families. They are easy to train if treated with respect and make great companions.

As wonderful as Rottweilers can be, they aren't the dog for everyone. You must not only be dedicated to training and socializing your Rottie, you must also deal with people who don't understand the breed and pre-judge it. Because of bad or tragic experiences with Rottweilers or other large breeds, some cities have banned the breed. It's unfair to judge an entire breed by the actions of a few, but it's a reality you will have to deal with if you own a Rottweiler.

You can do your part to redeem the reputation of the breed by training your Rottweiler to obey and respect people. Most important, don't put your Rottie in the backyard and forget about him. This is a dog who is loyal to his people and wants to be with them. If you give him the guidance and structure he needs, you'll be rewarded with one of the finest companions in the world.

The Official Temperament



Rottweiler Temperament


The ADRK (Allegmeiner Deutscher Rottweiler Klub) is the German governing organization for the Rottweiler breed.

It's also responsible for setting, maintaining, and updating/revising the Breed Standard at an international level.

This is the organization that 'gave birth' to the Rottweiler breed and is the ultimate authority when it comes to the integrity of the breed.

The #ADRK Breed Standard describes Rottweiler behavior and temperament like this....

'... good natured, placid in basic disposition and fond of children. Very devoted, obedient, biddable and eager to work... self assured, steady and fearless....'

Here in the USA, the #AKC (American Kennel Club) Breed Standard characterizes the correct Rottweiler temperament in this way.....


'Calm, confident and courageous, with a self-assured aloofness... an intelligent dog of extreme hardness and adaptability, with a strong willingness to work...'

These descriptions give you a good idea of what to expect from an adult Rottweiler who is well-bred and has been raised correctly.


It's important to know that Rottweiler behavior should never include indiscriminate aggression, or appear vicious, 'sharp', fearful or nervous (skittish).


Unfortunately poorly-bred, poorly-socialized and improperly raised Rottweilers (and there are a LOT of them), may carry these personality traits. Be aware of this and choose your puppy or dog carefully. If you're purchasing your Rottie, only buy from responsible and reputable breeders.




Wednesday, November 4, 2015

Corgi - The Cardigan and the Pembroke see the differences

There are two breeds of Welsh corgis, the Cardigan and the Pembroke, each named for the county in Wales where it originated. The two breeds were recognized as one breed until 1934 when the Kennel Club recognized them as Pembroke and Cardigan. The differences between the two breeds include bone structure, body length, and size. Cardigans are the larger of the two breeds, with large rounded ears and a 12-inch-long foxy, flowing tail set in line with the body. Though the Cardigan is allowed more colours than the Pembroke, white should not predominate in its coat. 

corgi dog
The Cardigan Corgi


The Cardigan is a double-coated dog where the outer coat is dense, slightly harsh in texture, and of medium length. The dog's undercoat is short, soft, and thick. The breed stands about 12 inches (30 cm) at the shoulder, and weighs about 30 pounds (14 kg). The Cardigan is sturdy, mobile, alert, active, intelligent, steady, and neither shy nor aggressive.







pembroke corgi
Pembroke Corgi
Pembrokes feature pointed ears, and are somewhat smaller in stature than the Cardigan. Considered a practical dog, they are low-set, intelligent, strong and sturdy with stamina sufficient to work a day on the farm. The dog's head is fox-like and the tail short, which can be accomplished through breeding or docking. Historically, the Pembroke was a breed with a natural bob tail (a very short tail), and today, if the Pembroke has a tail at all, it is usually curly. Due to the advent of tail docking in dogs, the bob tail was not aggressively pursued, with breeders focusing instead on other characteristics, and the tail artificially shortened if need be. Given that some countries now ban docking, breeders are again attempting to select dogs with the genes for natural bob tails. Pembrokes stand from 10 inches (25 cm) to 12 inches (30 cm), and weigh approximately 28 pounds (13 kg).


Corgis are herding dogs, and perform their duties by nipping at the heels; the dog's low height allows it to avoid being kicked in the process. As herding dogs, corgis work livestock differently than other breeds. Instead of gathering the cattle the way a collie would, by running around the livestock, corgis drive the herd forward by nipping at their heels and working them from behind in semicircles. Seldom giving ground, if an animal should turn and charge, the corgi will bite its nose, causing it to turn and rejoin the herd. Although they specialize in herding cattle, corgis are also used to herd sheep and Welsh ponies. Welsh corgis also guarded children and were pets.
The corgi's origin is difficult to trace. There is mention in an 11th-century manuscript of a Welsh cattle dog, though there is no evidence about whether this is the corgi or an ancestor.

Welsh folklore says the corgi is the preferred mount of tiny, woodland fairy warriors. There is also a folk legend that says corgis were a gift from the woodland fairies, and that the breed's markings were left on its coat by fairy harnesses and saddles. Corgis often have a marking, a white stripe, that runs from the nose, through the eyes, and up into the forehead; this marking is referred to as their blaze.


The first recorded date for corgis appearing in the show ring in Wales is 1925.
The first show corgis were straight off the farm and gained only moderate attention. Subsequent breeding efforts to improve upon the dog's good looks were rewarded with increased popularity. For years the two breeds, the Cardigan Welsh corgi and the Pembroke Welsh corgi, were shown as two varieties of a single breed. Since the two Corgi breeds developed in the Welsh hill country, in areas only a few miles apart, there is evidence of crossbreeding between the two that accounts for the similarities.

The Cardigan is one of the oldest breeds of dog in Britain and has been employed for centuries by Welsh farmers to herd cattle, herding the owner's livestock to grazing areas and driving the neighbour's cattle out of gardens and open pastures. In early settlements these dogs were prized family members, helping hunt game and guarding children. The Pembroke is believed to have been introduced to Wales by Flemish weavers about 1100, though 920 is also a suggested date. Another possibility for this corgi's origin is breeding between Cardigans and the Swedish Vallhund, a spitz-type dog resembling the Pembroke and brought to Wales by Norse invaders.

In 1933 the first Welsh Corgis were brought to the United States by American breeder Mrs. Lewis Roesler, for her Merriedip Kennels in the Berkshire Hills of Massachusetts. She purchased a Pembroke bitch, Little Madam, at London's Paddington Station for twelve pounds at the time, followed by a mate named Captain William Lewis. The breed received recognition in America in 1934 with Mrs. Roesler's dogs being the first recorded Pembroke Corgis in America.

There has recently been a concern regarding the population size of the Welsh Corgi. Currently the Corgi is on Britain Kennel Club's watch list. In 2013, only 241 Welsh Corgis were registered. In order to stay off the breed vulnerable list 300 corgis would need to be registered; this is not expected.

The Cardigan tends to be a little hardier and has fewer documented hereditary health problems; however, both types of dog are genetically predisposed to encounter canine hip dysplasia, canine degenerative myelopathy, and progressive retinal atrophy more frequently than other breeds in this group. Persistent papillary membrane (PPM) is an eye disease that occurs in a number of Pembrokes. PPM occurs when pieces of developmental membrane remain, measuring from small spots to large connected threads. Cardigan Welsh corgis have a typical life expectancy between 12 and 14 years, and Pembroke Welsh corgis typically live between 12 and 15 years.

Corgis often compete in dog agility trials, obedience, showmanship, flyball, tracking, and herding events. Herding instincts and trainability can be measured at noncompetitive herding tests. Cardigan and Pembroke corgis exhibiting basic herding instincts can be trained to compete in herding trials.


Corgis are very active and energetic. They have a strong desire to please and should receive both physical and mental exercise regularly. They should be socialized early on because they tend to be shy and cautious with strangers and other dogs. They have a tendency to be very vocal, and for this reason make good alarm dogs. They are typically good with children, but due to their herding behavior they may nip at their heels during play, although this behavior can be trained out of the dog.Pembroke corgis are outgoing and playful as well as bold and protective while Cardigan corgis are more devoted and affectionate.

Outside Wales, Queen Elizabeth II has kept a number of corgis in her retinue, typically four and once as many as thirteen. Her first corgi was called Susan. She currently keeps two corgis who are about twelve years old.
Some portraits of Queen Elizabeth II include a corgi.
Corgis as characters were incorporated into the storybook fantasies Corgiville Fair, The Great Corgiville Kidnapping, and Corgiville Christmas of American author and illustrator Tasha Tudor. In 1961, the Walt Disney film, Little Dog Lost, brought the Pembroke Corgi widespread publicity. In the anime Cowboy Bebop, the main characters have a super-intelligent Pembroke Welsh corgi, Ein, on their ship.
The Top Shelf graphic novel Korgi plays on the folklore tradition of the corgi as a faerie draft animal. It features the "Mollies" (fairy-like beings) who live in close relationship with the land and their Korgi friends, who are based on and resemble the Pembroke Welsh corgi.


Monday, November 2, 2015

Considerations when buying toys for dogs and cats



While it may be tempting for some to get that gigantic chew bone or the brightly colored squeaky toy, some caution is advised before shopping for pets.

Know your pet recipient

As with a gift for a human, realize that each pet has their preferences (chewer, ball player, etc.) and some may have health conditions that warrant special attention when deciding on a gift.
Food allergies are common in pets, so tuna treats are not the gift for the fish-allergic feline.
Some pets have special dietary needs. Fatty or sugary treats are not appropriate for the diabetic or overweight pet.
Whenever buying food or treat gifts for animals that are on a special diet or allergic to certain foods, remember to check the labels carefully - even when labeled as "beef" or "chicken" there are often other fillers, such as corn or fish, that may cause problems for sensitive pets. (See Unsafe Toys)

Toys to Avoid


Toys that resemble common items


Caution is advised when purchasing toys that are stuffed animals or resemble "regular" items such as shoes. Pets may not differentiate between their toys and human toys (or shoes). This is especially important in a house with small children - stuffed animals abound and the shoes are about the same size as the 'toy' ones. (See Toys are not a Luxury)

Dyes and preservatives

Pets don't care what color it is, the colors added to treats and chews are for the people. (Think of the stuff dogs eat in the yard.) In addition to not being healthful, dyes may stain bedding and carpet where your pet is consuming the treat.

Flimsy construction and dangerous materials

Thin rubber squeak toys and Mylar ribbon cat toys are colorful and fun, but left unsupervised, a pet may chew and consume parts of these toys, with potentially very serious consequences.

String Alert

Given the chance, many cats will continue to consume a ribbon or string (tree tinsel, gift wrap, or cat 'fishing pole' type toys). Once consumed, the ribbon will bunch up in the intestines and can be fatal. This condition is referred to as a linear foreign body, and veterinary attention is required immediately. These toys are OK with supervision, but after playing, the ribbon toy should be placed in closed area, such as a closet.


Ingestible Toys Not Always Digestible

Rubber balls and chew toys can also have serious consequences when consumed. If large enough pieces are swallowed, they can cause a intestinal foreign body obstruction, also potentially life-threatening. Smooth objects (balls, coins, marbles) and hard rubber toys may be a cause of intestinal obstruction and often necessitate surgical removal.
I have removed a rubber rat head from a cat's intestine, so cats can be victims of dietary indiscretion as well as dogs. (When the owner saw the toy rat head, chewed off of the toy rat body, she exclaimed that it had been kitty's favorite toy.)


Favorite Pet Gifts

Dogs

I love the Kong Dog Toy. They offer a wide variety of sizes, shapes and "chewing strengths" - be sure to purchase a toy that is appropriate for the dog. Kong also makes cat toys now too, that are favorites of my cats.



Cats


My felines love a good catnip treat. It is important to note that not all cats enjoy catnip - approximately 30% of them do not have the necessary receptors to 'experience' the catnip, so some cats could care less about this as a gift. Catnip toys come in a variety of shapes and sizes. My cats love them!
Another good choice for cats during the cold winter months is a nice pet snuggler bed.

Thursday, October 29, 2015

Things You Can Do to Make Halloween Safer for Your Pet


Don't feed your pets Halloween candy, especially if it contains chocolate or xylitol (a common sugar substitute found in sugar-free candies and gum);

Make sure your pet is properly identified (microchip, collar and ID tag) in case s/he escapes through the open door while you're distracted with trick-or-treaters;

Keep lit candles and jack-o-lanterns out of reach of pets;
If you plan to put a costume on your pet, make sure it fits properly and is comfortable, doesn't have any pieces that can easily be chewed off, and doesn't interfere with your pet's sight, hearing, breathing, opening its mouth, or moving. Take time to get your pet accustomed to the costume before Halloween, and never leave your pet unsupervised while he/she is wearing a costume;

Keep glow sticks and glow jewelry away from your pets. Although the liquid in these products isn't likely toxic, it tastes really bad and makes pets salivate excessively and act strangely;

If your pet is wary of strangers or has a tendency to bite, put him/her in another room during trick-or-treating hours or provide him/her with a safe hiding place;

Keep your pet inside.

Attention, animal lovers, it's almost the spookiest night of the year! The ASPCA recommends taking some common sense precautions this Halloween to keep you and your pet saying "trick or treat!" all the way to November 1.



No tricks, no treats: That bowl of candy is for trick-or-treaters, not for Scruffy and Fluffy. Chocolate in all forms—especially dark or baking chocolate—can be very dangerous for dogs and cats. Candies containing the artificial sweetener xylitol can also cause problems. If you do suspect your pet has ingested something toxic, please call your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at (888) 426-4435.


Popular Halloween plants such as pumpkins and decorative corn are considered to be relatively nontoxic, but they can produce stomach upset in pets who nibble on them.


Wires and cords from electric lights and other decorations should be kept out of reach of your pets. If chewed, your pet might suffer cuts or burns, or receive a possibly life-threatening electrical shock.


A carved pumpkin certainly is festive, but do exercise caution if you choose to add a candle. Pets can easily knock a lit pumpkin over and cause a fire. Curious kittens especially run the risk of getting burned or singed by candle flames.


Dress-up can be a big mess-up for some pets. Please don't put your dog or cat in a costume UNLESS you know he or she loves it (yup, a few pets are real hams!). For pets who prefer their “birthday suits,” however, wearing a costume may cause undue stress.


If you do dress up your pet, make sure the costume isn't annoying or unsafe. It should not constrict the animal's movement or hearing, or impede his ability to breathe, bark or meow. Also, be sure to try on costumes before the big night. If your pet seems distressed, allergic or shows abnormal behavior, consider letting him go au naturale or donning a festive bandana.


Take a closer look at your pet’s costume and make sure it does not have small, dangling or easily chewed-off pieces that he could choke on. Also, ill-fitting outfits can get twisted on external objects or your pet, leading to injury.


All but the most social dogs and cats should be kept in a separate room away from the front door during peak trick-or-treating hours. Too many strangers can be scary and stressful for pets.


When opening the door for trick-or-treaters, take care that your cat or dog doesn't dart outside.

IDs, please! Always make sure your dog or cat has proper identification. If for any reason your pet escapes and becomes lost, a collar and tags and/or a microchip can be a lifesaver, increaing the chances that he or she will be returned to you.


(https://www.avma.org and https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/halloween-safety-tips)

Tuesday, October 20, 2015

Angora Rabbit


The Angora rabbit (Turkish: Ankara tavşanı) is a variety of domestic rabbit bred for its long, soft wool. The Angora is one of the oldest types of domestic rabbit, originating in Ankara (historically known as Angora), present day Turkey, along with the Angora cat and Angora goat. The rabbits were popular pets with French royalty in the mid-18th century, and spread to other parts of Europe by the end of the century. They first appeared in the United States in the early 20th century. They are bred largely for their long Angora wool, which may be removed by shearing, combing, or plucking. There are many individual breeds of Angora rabbits, four of which are recognized by American Rabbit Breeders' Association (ARBA); they are English, French, Giant, and Satin. Other breeds include German, Chinese, Swiss, Finnish, Korean, and St. Lucian.



Angora Basics

Angora is a luxury fiber with many special qualities. Lustrous, soft, and seven times warmer than sheep’s wool, these fibers have an inner structure of air an cell that give Angora yarn and garments a thermal quality. In addition, the fibers “bloom” or fluff up as garments are worn and cared for which increases their warmth and elegant appearance.
An Angora Rabbit is a fiber producing animal. The wool is plucked, combed, or clipped and spun into a luxurious yam. This does not harm the rabbit; the wool is ready to shed and removing it will help keep the rabbit in good condition.

The following are some common questions asked by beginning rabbit owners.

What type of housing do I need? 

An all-wire cage is best for an Angora rabbit because this keeps him off the wet and soiled bedding. The sides of the cages should be made of2" x I" wire, and the floor should be made of 1/2" x 1 " wire. A 30"x30" cage is an ideal size. He also needs a cover to protect him from the rain, snow, and drafts, and to keep him shaded in the summer. 
Does the rabbit get cold outside? 
Angoras are very hardy and do well in cold weather. His coat needs to be kept well groomed and free of matts (tangled wool) because matted wool does not insulate him from the cold. A piece of plastic or plywood on three sides of his cage will protect him from wind and drafts in the winter. On the coldest nights, you can throw a blanket over the cage for added protection. 

What about hot summer weather? 

Rabbits do suffer from the heat. A well ventilated, shaded rabbitry will help. On those really unbearable days, place a plastic 2-liter soda bottle which has been filled with water and frozen in the rabbit's cage for him to lie against. 

What does the rabbit eat? 

Angoras eat from 4-8 ounces of pellets daily, depending on their mature weight. A handful of hay is important for fiber production. About 1 tablespoon of sunflower seeds is a good daily supplement and the seed's oil helps the rabbit's digestion. Rabbits must have fresh water at all times. 
How much fiber will an Angora produce? 
English & French Angoras yield 10-16 ounces of wool per year; however Giants & Germans produce up to 28 - 40 ounces per year. Since Angora is lighter and warmer than sheep's wool, this will go a long way.

Grooming

Whether you choose to use the fiber your Angora produces or not, the rabbit's wool must be removed when it is shedding. This will help keep your rabbit healthy. 

Do I need special tools? 

Dog grooming equipment is commonly used to groom Angora rabbits. A steel toothed comb, a bulb-tipped brush, a slicker brush, and a pair of scissors are handy tools. 

How often do I groom the rabbit? 

Grooming your animal once a week should keep him in good condition until he is ready to molt, but more frequent attention and handling will help you both become accustomed to one another.


How do I groom the rabbit? 

To maintain an Angora that is not molting, either put the rabbit on your lap or on a table. The purpose of this grooming session is to comb through the wool over the entire animal. Pay particular attention to areas that rub against one another such as the base of the tail or behind the ears. Be sure to brush his legs and belly. 


How do I remove the matts? 

If the matt can be pulled apart with your fingers, the wool is "webbed" and may be gently combed out. If the matt seems like a solid mass of wool, then the kindest way to remove it is simply cut it off. Feel for the rabbit's skin first, and watch out for it's tail; it's longer than you may think. 
How often does the rabbit shed? 
Generally, a rabbit will need to be plucked every two to three months. 

How do I know when to pluck the rabbit? 

Your rabbit is ready to pluck when you see loose wool on the cage or trailing off his back. 
How do I pluck the rabbit? 
Go over the rabbit with a comb or bulb-tipped brush. This helps loosen the wool. Gently pull out the loose wool, keeping your fingers toward the tip of the wool to catch only the longest coat. You may want to hold the skin with your other hand to reduce stress. If your rabbit seems stressed during or after plucking, next time try to give him a half of a baby aspirin 30 minutes before plucking. 

How do I store the wool? 

A plastic box, shoe box, or cookie tin will keep the fiber from getting tangled or packed down. Put a moth ball in the box to discourage insects.

What about the toenails? 

Your rabbit's toenails should be clipped monthly. A pair of dog clippers may be used. Like a dog, the living part of the rabbit's nail extends into the nail, so be careful not to cut into this or your rabbit may bleed. You may wish to examine the rabbit's nail with a light behind it so you can see where the dark vein extends into the nail.

Woll Block

Wool block is a mass of wool caught in the rabbit's digestive system, similar to a fur ball in a cat. The rabbit ingests the wool when grooming himself. He cannot regurgitate the wool like a cat does, and the blockage gives the rabbit a full feeling, so he does not eat. Wool block can be fatal.

What are the symptoms of wool block? 

Your rabbit may begin to excrete smaller or misshapen dropping and may not finish his food or water. Ha may pass no droppings at all.

How do I treat a case of wool block? 

Immediately pluck or shear the rabbit. Withdraw your rabbit's pellets and feed only rolled oats or hay. Pellets only add to the blockage at this point. Always provide water. You may administer anyone of the following: 5 papaya enzyme pills (the enzyme in the pill breaks down the wool and helps the wool pass through the digestive tract).These pills are found in the vitamin section of the pharmacy or a health food store. You can also administer a tablespoon of fur ball remedy (such as Femalt), or a fresh pineapple (pineapples also contain the necessary enzyme). If the blockage is large, you may have to continue treatment over several days. After the rabbit passes the blockage, resume his pelleted food slowly. 
How can I prevent wool block? 
Keeping you rabbit in good condition with no loose, over ripe wool will help him ingest as little wool as possible when he is grooming himself. Many Angora rabbit owners give papaya/pineapple enzyme to their rabbits once a week. Other preventatives include a weekly dose of Femalt. You may also want to treat your rabbit to fresh pineapple. 

Breeds of Angora Rabbits

There are four recognized breeds of Angora rabbits: English, French, Satin & Giant plus the more recently imported German Angora. The breeder from whom you purchased your rabbit should provide you with information about the Angora you own.

Helpfull Hints

-To remove wool build up on your rabbit's cage, use a propane torch. Be sure to remove your rabbit first and keep water handy. You can also use a long-handled bathroom brush to scrub the wool off the wire. 

-Calcium present in the urine may build up on the wire where your rabbit urinate. A vinegar solution and a wire brush help dissolve and remove this buildup.
-If your rabbit develops static while being groomed, rub your hands or your rabbit with a fabric softener sheet.
-Your rabbit needs to gnaw to prevent his teeth from growing too long. You can give him a block of hard wood to chew (not plywood which contains formaldehyde).
-Be consistent with your rabbit; he'll know what to expect.
-Don't allow young children to play with your rabbit without supervision.
-Use your rabbit's dropping in your garden; your tomatoes will thank you.

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